Chalk Board Leaves

Need a quick, easy cookie design for the upcoming turkey day festivities??A tutorial: Chalk Fall Leaves

Back in the day… (Ha! I’ve always wanted to say that!), we had chalk boards our classrooms. Sometime during college, they started changing over to dry erase boards. That was all about the same time that email and the internet exploded. Did I just date myself?!?

But those chalk boards were messy! And someone had to bang the erasers together to clean them out…inhaling the dust… NO ONE missed them.

But then they started showing up again. In the oddest places too. There’s a chalk board wall at my boys’ dentist office. And now chalk boards are fun. Retro even. It only makes sense to incorporate the idea into the cookie world!

So, these are chalk board cookies. Some fabulous cookiers came up with the idea and I’m just going to change it up a bit. I’m not sure who had the original idea, so please forgive me! There’s a fabulous tutorial here on Ali Bee’s Bake Shop:

http://snargblog.blogspot.com/2012/03/tutorial-hand-painting-basics.html

What you need for these:

- Leaf cookies, iced with black royal icing and dry

- Paint brush

- White, red, yellow and orange food coloring

- Small glass of water

- Plate to mix your colors on

So, you have your cookies baked and are getting ready to cover them in black icing. You like your family, right? Maybe you don’t want them to have black teeth/lips/chin… Or maybe you do! I’m not here to judge, only to give you some options. If you would like to minimize the ‘black icing effect’, please check out Lila Loa’s blog for adding some cocoa powder to your icing.

http://www.lilaloa.com/2013/07/back-to-school-cookies.html

 Black royal icing cookies

This is kinda how my set-up looks. It’s not pretty or even a particularly great picture but I wanted to show you. I used to mix my paint colors on a plate but they would spread out, making it difficult. Paint colors mixed and a lot ended up getting wasted. These painter’s palate plates (official name??) are perfect. And, yes, that’s a shot glass of water in the center!

Lets’s talk about mixing your paint. I use Americolor gels for this project. What I did was use equal parts of white with each of my colors. This is not easy to ‘measure’ since my white tends to pour out. But it should give you an idea of where to start. The yellow had the consistency of mustard – again, just to give you an idea. As you can see, you do not need a lot of paint mixed up for this project.

Make sure that you stir the 2 paint colors together. Use the end of a paint brush, a toothpick, whatever is handy…

Now, let’s talk paint brushes. I used 2 different sizes for these cookies. I outlined the cookie first, using a size 20/0. This paint brush tends to be thicker and I wanted the outline to be a bit bolder. The details were then done with a 10/0 – which has a much finer tip. Paintbrushes usually say right them what size they are.

My paint set-upYou want to start with a damp brush. If your paint is globby (again, is that a word??), your paint brush is too dry. If you can see any droplets of water, it’s too wet.

Start with a large brush (20/0) and outline the cookie.

Then use the smaller paint brush (10/0) and add your details.

When adding your details, remember that less is more!

Outlining your leaf Adding your chalk leaf details

The paint on these cookies will dry fairly quickly.

Put these on a pretty platter for your company or use as a hostess gift!

Enjoy!!


Chalk Leaves

Kari ~ Yankee Girl Yummies

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Comments

  1. Such an awesome idea! Love this look!

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